Predictive Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Breast Carcinoma

Jessica Pastoriza, John McNelis, Afshin Parsikia, Erin Lewis, Marie Ward, Corrado P. Marini, Maria T. Castaldi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Operative interventions for breast cancer are generally classified as clean surgeries. Surgical site infections (SSIs), while rare, do occur. This study sought to identify risk factors for SSI, using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). Methods: NSQIP’s participant use data files (PUF) between 2012 and 2015 were examined. Female patients with invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery were identified through CPT and ICD9 codes. Non-SSI and SSI groups were compared and the statistical differences were addressed through propensity score weighting. Multivariate logistic regression testing was used to identify predictors of SSI. Results: This study examined 30 544 lumpectomies and 23 494 mastectomies. SSI rate was 1126/54 038 patients (2.1%). In the weighted dataset, mastectomy, diabetes, smoking, COPD, ASA class-severe, BMI >35 kg/m2, and length of stay (LOS) >1 day were associated with an increased odds ratio (OR) of SSI. The OR for SSI was highest after mastectomy with reconstruction (OR 2.626, P <.001; 95% CI 2.073-3.325). Postoperative variables associated with an increased OR of SSIs included systemic infection, unplanned reoperation wound dehiscence, and renal failure. Conclusion: Mastectomy, diabetes, smoking, COPD, ASA class-severe, BMI >35 kg/m2, length of stay (LOS) >1 day are associated with an increased OR for SSIs following breast surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume87
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • breast surgery
  • NSQIP
  • surgical site infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Predictive Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Breast Carcinoma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this